Coal Bin: Finishing Boulders 4-8

September 11th, 2013 · No Comments · 2013 Coal Bin (Working title)

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J.R. Uretsky can lay down triangles like nobodies business. Somewhere towards the middle of this I was dreading doing another triangle and then a peaceful bliss came over me and I have ended up really liking the process and welcome triangles in the future. They are so fabulously to-the-point: 3 measurements do not lie–a specific triangle has to be that specific triangle. There is peace in that.

 

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J.R. Uretsky and Megan

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Assistant J.R. Uretsky and second assistant Alex Peacock. There is a lot of both of these people in these boulders.

 

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J.R. Uretsky

 

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Alright, this is a little boulder that didn’t make it into the final film shoot. It has a basin for our performer  to wash her hands, following traditional Japanese etiquette before entering a tea house. I still like the idea, but there wasn’t enough space for it once we got all the boulders in the final film location.

Coal Bin: Boulder 3 of 9

September 10th, 2013 · No Comments · 2013 Coal Bin (Working title)

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Our Assistant J.R. Uretsky with PA Christian Meade securing a triangle.

 

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The Triangle factory: (left to right) PA Ryan Hawk, Assistant J.R. Uretsky, PA Christian Meade and PA Greg Lookerse

 

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Coal Bin: Boulder 2 of 9

September 10th, 2013 · No Comments · 2013 Coal Bin (Working title)

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Each triangle take a team of three people about 20-30 minutes. A team of five people can do a triangle in 15 minutes.

Coal Bin: Finished Boulder 1 of 9

September 10th, 2013 · No Comments · 2013 Coal Bin (Working title)

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Coal Bin: Learning Boulder Making

September 10th, 2013 · No Comments · 2013 Coal Bin (Working title)

 

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If you look carefully, you’ll notice the first triangles are much rougher than the later ones. There’s a lot of tricks we’re having to learn on the fly.

 

 

Coal Bin: Starting to Make Coal Boulders

September 10th, 2013 · No Comments · 2013 Coal Bin (Working title)

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We start with a 2×4 frame that’s strong enough to suspend them.

Coal Bin: Getting Started at WaterFire

September 10th, 2013 · No Comments · 2013 Coal Bin (Working title)

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February and freezing cold in the WaterFire Warehouse.

Our first task was to build this box. Every boulder that will be craned into the Coal Bin at MASS MoCA has to fit through this space. When building, I always prefer lining things up more than relying on numbers alone.

Coal Bin: Moving to WaterFire

September 10th, 2013 · No Comments · 2013 Coal Bin (Working title)

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Barnaby Evans and WaterFire have invited us to be WaterFire Artist in Residence and build the Coal Bin Project [working title, of course] at WaterFire’s new giant warehouse. Furthermore, we’ll create a one night performance installation in this space on August 16, 2013.

With this new project space, WaterFire aims to support Providence artists and foster creative projects. We’re delighted to be working with them.

Coal Bin: Will Reeves

September 10th, 2013 · No Comments · 2013 Coal Bin (Working title)

 

 

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A big part of our team, Will Reeves, who has been a lead performer in our project When We Didn’t Touch the Ground, and performer in The Shape of Our Best Intentions (that was fabricated and filmed in the Wurks project space [I can't believe they don't have a web site] that Will directs), and who is fabricating the 57′ vertical camera elevator we’ll need for this project (more on that later), thinks we should fabricate the boulders with sprayed concrete on a metal frame.

And he made this great model.

Only problem: Megan and I know  little about sprayed concrete and metal. These are both great materials, but there is a point where knowing your limits can make or break a project. Spreading yourselves too thin can seriously slow things down or worse: hit nasty technical quick sand. This model looked too good to not mention though. Cheers, Will.

Coal Bin: Still Learning How to Make a Chunk of Coal

September 10th, 2013 · No Comments · 2013 Coal Bin (Working title)

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This early test ended up killing any and all plaster dreams. It became clear that the battle with plaster was a great understructure–and if you’re going to go to the trouble of building a GREAT understructure, then why not go the extra step and use a better skin too.

Our assistant J.R., Meg and I were mulling this over when Meg came up with the solution: wood triangles. J.R. and I groaned at how much trouble that would be. Sure, they’d look great but damn: that’s a lot of triangles.